Sunday Post: The Best of Intentions

The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted at the @ Caffeinated Reviewer. It’s a chance to share news~ A post to recap the past week on your blog and showcase books and things we have received. Share news about what is coming up on our blog for the week ahead. See the rules here.

Where does the time go? I had a busy work week last week so I didn’t get all the books read that I planned. Sometimes the best-laid plans just do not work out. I’m going on vacation part of next week and will have more time to catch up on my reading. I’m going to try and set a less ambitious schedule for the next couple of weeks anyway because I’ve got several reviews due for the Historical Novel Society in June. I won’t be able to publish those until August 1st, per their policy, but I still have some that I did back in March for the May issue that I haven’t shared yet, and at least one of those will go up this week.

REVIEW OF LAST WEEK

Monday I did a blog tour and book review of The Adoption for Bookouture

Tuesday I reviewed Freedom or Death, the fourth book in the Juche series by Adria Carmichael.

Thursday I posted a review of The Commandant’s Daughter that I did for the May issue of Historical Novel Society.

And for Self-Published Saturday I reviewed A Class Coveted by Susie Murphy.

PREVIEW OF THE COMING WEEK

On Sunday of course is Sunday Spotlight.

On Monday I will post a review of The Existentialist by Tom Maremaa

On Tuesday I will post a review of The Eleventh Commandment by Mary F. Burns. I wrote this one back in March for the May issue of Historical Novel Society’s magazine, Historical Novels Review.

On Thursday I will post a review of The Girl from Lamaha Street, which was originally planned for last week but time got the better of me.

For Self-Published Saturday I will spotlight some self-published books.

BOOKS APPROVED ON NETGALLEY THIS WEEK:

I must be in the mood for baking because I requested and received two cookbooks: BAKE by Paul Hollywood and Everyday Cake by Polina Chesnakova.

Then I picked up a novel about a young pie maker who gets a magical chance to see how her life would have worked out if she had made different choices. It’s called The Magic of Lemon Drop Pie by Rachel Linden. I must have been hungry when I made my Netgalley requests.

I was also approved for Nicholas Sparks’ new book Dreamland, which is not about food. So that’s one out of four.

EDITED to add that I received a 917-page book from Greenleaf Book Group. It’s called Gods of Deception and it’s huge. This one’s gonna take a while.

Have a great week everyone! Hopefully I’ll be able to get a lot of reading done over Memorial Day weekend.

Self-Published Saturday: A Class Coveted by Susie Murphy

Self-Published Saturday is my effort to help Self-Published/Indie authors with marketing. These authors have to do it all, from cover design to editing to marketing. If I can help even a little bit with marketing, I’m happy to do it. This week’s feature is A Class Coveted by Susie Murphy, the fourth book in the A Matter of Class series.

BOOK DESCRIPTION

It’s 1836, and Bridget and Cormac have arrived, full of hope, to the city of Boston with their growing family. However, as they adjust to domestic life together for the first time, they face anti-Irish sentiment from the local Americans, as well as a threat to their happiness from a much closer source.

Cormac undertakes the challenging search for his missing sister, Bronagh. He is determined to do all he can to put the broken pieces of his family back together, but the appalling truth he uncovers will shake him to his core.

Meanwhile, as Emily grows up in this new country, she realises how her parents’ past actions will affect her entire future and she begins to covet that which is no longer within her reach. When she receives an unexpected proposition, will she be able to resist its temptation, despite the untrustworthy nature of the person behind it?

A Class Coveted is the fourth book in Susie Murphy’s historical fiction series A Matter of Class. The story will continue in the fifth book, A Class Reunited.

BOOK REVIEW

A Class Coveted is the fourth book in the A Matter of Class series. I would recommend reading the books in order. Book One begins in Ireland with Cormac as a stablehand and Bridget as an heiress to a great estate, and their story continues to develop and progress throughout this saga. In this installment, Bridget, Cormac, their daughter Emily, and Cormac’s sister Orlaith have come to America searching for Cormac’s sister Bronagh. Upon arrival in Boston, they are shocked at the discrimination and outright shunning of the Irish people, who were often denied jobs and lodging just for being from Ireland. As they struggle to survive with dwindling funds, they continue their search for Bronagh. Orlaith also begins to try and make her own living as a midwife.

This is another captivating novel in this series and a fascinating look at Boston in 1836. The characters and their story still grab my attention four books in. We also learn more about Orlaith than we have before, and we watch the coming of age of Emily, who becomes a main character by the end of the book. Ultimately the story ends on a cliffhanger and several plotlines are still open, but the author promises us Book five in a note at the end. These are characters the reader will enjoy getting to know, and the author is great at creating captivating plotlines. Fans of historical romantic adventures will enjoy this one.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Susie Murphy is an Irish historical fiction author. She loves historical fiction so much that she often wishes she had been born two hundred years ago. Still, she remains grateful for many aspects of the modern age, including women’s suffrage, electric showers and pizza. Susie has published four novels in her A Matter of Class series, a sweeping romance saga which begins in Ireland in 1828.

To find out more, visit www.susiemurphywrites.com, where you can join the Susie Murphy Readers’ Club and receive a collection of six free short stories which tie in with A Matter of Class.

BUY THE WHOLE SERIES ON AMAZON

BUY THE WHOLE SERIES ON AMAZON UK

*Kindle Unlimited subscribers can read the whole series for free.

*If you buy the book, please leave reviews on Amazon and Goodreads, as well as anywhere else you review books.  Some people feel very daunted by writing a review. Don’t worry. You do not have to write a masterpiece. Just a couple of lines about how the book made you feel will make the author’s day and help the book succeed. The more reviews a book has, the more Amazon will promote it.

*Please click on the “share” buttons below and share these books with your Twitter, Facebook, and WordPress followers. A little bit of help from all of us will help self-published authors go a long way!

Book Review: The Commandant’s Daughter #HistoricalNovelSociety #WorldWar2

Germany, 1933.  Hannelore (Hanni) Foss is a young girl living in Berlin as the Nazis rise to power.  Her father is a prominent figure in the Nazi party, and she lives the life that he dictates, attending Nazi functions and doing what she’s told.  Then she meets Ezra Stein, a photographer, and he shows her the art of looking at her surroundings through the lens of a camera.  She soon begins to see behind the façade of her father’s world.  In 1946 Berlin, after the fall of the Nazis, Hanni Winter has reinvented her life, working in the studio of Ezra’s son and hoping to one day bring her father to justice. With a new name and a new purpose, she keeps her past well hidden.  When she meets Detective Freddy Schlüssel, she becomes his crime scene photographer, and they begin to investigate a string of murders.

This is a compelling story that does not hold back on the descriptions of Nazi atrocities, making for an authentic and heartbreaking read. We learn a little about the history of the Nuremberg trials and the many Nazis who managed to avoid prosecution. Hanni is a purposeful and driven main character who is wracked with guilt and desperate for forgiveness. Her quest for justice is never-ending.  Through Ezra’s son Natan, and through Freddy Schlüssel we get the viewpoint of Jews who are still in Berlin and are trying to begin again after horrific persecution and loss. The evil manipulations and vile acts of the Nazis are shown through Hanni’s father. The author’s expert knowledge of and research into photography are evident throughout the story. The Commandant’s Daughter gives us a candid view of Berlin, both during and after unspeakable atrocities, uniquely conveyed through the lens of a camera.

I received a free copy of this book from Bookouture via The Historical Novel Society. My review is voluntary and my opinions are my own.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

(In her own words) I seem to have followed a rather meandering career, including marketing and teaching and politics (don’t try and join the dots), to get where I have always wanted to be, which is writing historical fiction. I am a story lover as well as a story writer and nothing fascinates me more than a strong female protagonist and a quest. Hopefully those are what you will encounter when you pick up my books.

I am from the North of England but now live very happily in Glasgow with my American husband. Both my children have left home (one to London and one to Berlin) which may explain why I am finally writing. If I’m not at my desk you’ll most probably find me in the cinema, or just follow the sound of very loud music.

I’d love to hear from you and there are lots of ways you can find me, so jump in via my website https://www.catherinehokin.com/ or on my Cat Hokin FB page or on twitter @cathokin

BUY LINKS

AMAZON US|AMAZON UK

VISIT MY INSTAGRAM REVIEW

Book Review: Freedom or Death

This is the fourth book in the Juche series, which I would recommend reading in order. For quite a while now, Areum and her family have been in a concentration camp in the land of Choson, which is instantly recognizable as North Korea. Threatened daily with death and on the brink of starvation, Areum is more desperate than ever to find a way out for herself and her sister Nari. As she struggles to stay alive and plot her escape, she finds an ally she would have never expected.

I have enjoyed this series since the beginning, although the setting in a concentration camp is a hard one to read about. It is great to see the growth of Areum from a completely brainwashed teenager to someone who is very slowly beginning to see the light. The dynamic of a group of people who are in a life or death situation and are forced to turn on each other is sad and difficult to watch, and the way Areum navigates that is intriguing and often heartbreaking. There are moments of realization for Areum that are very powerful, especially one in particular that might cause you to shed some tears. . The combination of action and intrigue will keep you turning the page. This is a story about a concentration camp, but it’s also about the truth and how it can be shaped and manipulated. And it’s about the coming of age of a young girl forced into a terrible situation.

I received a free copy of this book from the author. My review is voluntary and my opinions are my own.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Adria Carmichael is a writer of dystopian fiction with a twist. When she is not devouring dystopian and post-apocalyptic content in any format – books, movies, TV-series and PlayStation games – she is crafting the epic and highly-addictive Juche saga, her 2020 debut novel series that takes place in the brutal, totalitarian nation of Choson. When the limit of doom and gloom is reached, a 10K run on a sunny day or binging a silly sitcom on a rainy day is her go-to way to unwind.

BUY THE SERIES

AMAZON|AMAZON UK

*Kindle Unlimited subscribers can read the series for free.

Blog Tour and Book Review: #TheAdoption #Bookouture #JennaKernan

Your little girl is all yours… isn’t she?

Dani and her husband Tate’s life together is almost perfect. But Dani is haunted by guilt for causing a terrible car accident that left her unable to have children. She can’t remember why she was driving so fast that day or where she was going. Her therapist says she should try to move on.

So when their application to adopt is accepted, Dani sobs with joy. As perfect little Willow nestles in her arms, Dani looks at Tate’s loving smile and knows he will always provide for his family, no matter what.

When Dani sees a woman staring as she pushes Willow’s stroller around the safe, gated Florida community where they live, she tells herself it’s simply an admiring passer-by. After all, Dani herself used to watch the local moms and wish she was in their shoes.

But when Dani wakes in the night to find Willow’s crib empty, their perfect life becomes a nightmare.

In her frantic distress for her daughter, Dani’s memories of the accident flash through her mind. And with a jolt she realises: everyone around her has been lying about that day.

Will Dani find out the truth before it’s too late for her baby girl?

Or will facing her own dark secrets tear them all apart?

A totally addictive and heart-stopping read with a truly mind-blowing twist. Fans of The Woman in the WindowGone Girl and The Wife Between Us won’t be able to put down this incredible thriller from bestselling author Jenna Kernan.

BOOK REVIEW

After a devastating car accident, Dani is affected with prosopagnosia, which is an inability to differentiate facial features. Dani is in counseling, dealing with the aftermath of the accident and the fact that she cannot recognize her own husband. She also has enormous guilt for the injuries caused to her twin sister in that accident. Then Dani and Tate adopt a little girl, and life is perfect for a while, But memories begin to surface, and Dani starts to realize things are not as they seem.

This is a novel filled with deception, betrayal, and suspense. The first half of the book builds the tension and the second half is diabolical, thrilling, and filled with surprises you won’t see coming. I had never heard of prosopagnosia, so this story also taught me something new. The plot is expertly crafted and the characters are well developed. This is a gasp-inducing, eye-widening, read-in-one-sitting thriller! Don’t miss it.

I received a free copy of this book from Bookouture via Netgalley. My review is voluntary and my opinions are my own.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Bestselling author Jenna Kernan writes gripping domestic thrillers. Her 2021 release, A Killer’s Daughter, won the bronze medal from the Florida Book Awards in the popular fiction category and her next release, The Adoption, arrives in May 2022 and features a couple whose adoption goes from blissful to terrifying when a dark secret and menacing stranger threaten the baby. Visit Jenna at www.jennakernan.com.

Sign up to be the first to hear about new releases from Jenna Kernan here: https://www.bookouture.com/jenna-kernan/

Buy Links: Amazon|Amazon UK

Sunday Post – Life is a Garden

The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted at the @ Caffeinated Reviewer. It’s a chance to share news~ A post to recap the past week on your blog and showcase books and things we have received. Share news about what is coming up on our blog for the week ahead. See the rules here.

MY WEEK

It was a busy work week, but I’ve started reading several books for the August edition of Historical Novels Review, the magazine of the Historical Novel Society.

I also have been repotting my tomato seedlings. I started them in little pods under a grow light and I’m putting them in larger peat cups before they go into the ground at the end of May. The next step is to start placing them outside in partial shade so they can get used to being outside full time. My husband has the garden all tilled up and ready to go. I love the gardening cycle. Spring is for planting, Summer is for tending, Fall is for harvesting and canning, and in Winter we enjoy the fruits of our labor. I know it’s not as cut and dried as that, but it is a consistency that can be relied on. I have actually missed my tomato garden, so it will be nice to see it again! I’m also planting peppers and onions. I will be canning salsa from ingredients I grew myself.

LAST WEEK ON THE BLOG

Monday I reviewed A Brilliant Night of Stars and Ice, a retelling of the sinking of the Titanic from the point of view of the Captain of the Carpathia, who led a rescue of many survivors.

On Monday I also reviewed The Salt Fields by Stacy D. Flood. This is a powerful book about a man who boards a train so he can leave the South behind. It is so well written that I had to include two quotes from the book itself in order to do it justice.

On Tuesday I reviewed the audiobook of The Wedding Season by Katy Birchall. This is a tale about a jilted bride that is both sad and laugh-out-loud funny. I have previously reviewed The Secret Bridesmaid by Birchall, and I love her writing style.

I also attempted Top Ten Tuesday and even though I got the directions wrong, I still enjoyed it.

Work and reading kept me busy until Saturday, and then I posted a review of The Coronation by Justin Newland for Self-Published Saturday.

NEXT WEEK ON THE BLOG

Today, besides the Sunday Post, I will be reviewing Freedom or Death, Book 4 of Adria Carmichael’s Juche Series, a coming-of-age dystopian saga set in a North Korean concentration camp.

Monday I will be reviewing The Adoption by Jenna Kernan as part of a blog tour for Bookouture. I had posted last week I would be reviewing it on Friday, but I had the date wrong. So look for it on Monday.

On Wednesday, I will review The Commandant’s Daughter, by Catherine Hokin. This is book one of the Hanni Winter series. I reviewed this book for the May edition of Historical Novels Review.

On Thursday, I will be posting a review of The Girl from Lamaha Steet, which is author Sharon Maas’s memoir about her childhood in Guyana and time spent in an English boarding school.

For Self-Published Saturday, I’ll be reviewing A Class Coveted by Susie Murphy.

THIS WEEK’S READING

I’m finishing up The Girl from Lamaha Street and starting A Class Coveted, mentioned above.

I will also be reading The Pilot’s Girl by Catherine Hokin, which is the sequel to The Commandant’s Daughter mentioned above. I will be reviewing The Pilot’s Girl for the August edition of Historical Novels Review.

Self-Published Saturday: The Coronation by Justin Newland

Self-Published Saturday is my effort to help Self-Published/Indie authors with marketing. These authors have to do it all, from cover design to editing to marketing. If I can help even a little bit with marketing, I’m happy to do it. This week’s feature is a The Coronation, historical fiction with a tough of magical realism. It is set in Prussia in 1761.

BOOK DESCRIPTION

It is 1761. Prussia is at war with Russia and Austria. As the Russian army occupies East Prussia, King Frederick the Great and his men fight hard to win back their homeland.

In Ludwigshain, a Junker estate in East Prussia, Countess Marion von Adler celebrates an exceptional harvest. But this is soon requisitioned by Russian troops. When Marion tries to stop them, a Russian Captain strikes her. His Lieutenant, Ian Fermor, defends Marion’s honour, but is stabbed for his insubordination. Abandoned by the Russians, Fermor becomes a divisive figure on the estate.

Close to death, Fermor dreams of the Adler, a numinous eagle entity, whose territory extends across the lands of Northern Europe and which is mysteriously connected to the Enlightenment. What happens next will change the course of human history…

BOOK REVIEW

Justin Newland is known for creating well-researched historical fiction that is touched with magical realism, and he does not disappoint here. He brings us to East Prussia in 1761, and we meet Countess Marion Von Adler, who is trying to keep her people safe and fed during wartime. She meets Ian Fermor, Lieutenant of the Russian Army, who comes to her aid and is abandoned by the Russian Army. Their connection with the Adler, the mythical eagle, takes fascinating turns throughout this novel.

This is a unique take on the Seven Years War that is filled with adventure, suspense, and intrigue. What is the Adler and where is it leading Prussia and the world? How does the Industrial Revolution come into play? The reader will be left with a fascinating ending and a look at the future. Each chapter is headed with passages of scripture, which adds to the theme of the book, because following the Adler is a spiritual journey for Marion and Ian. This is quite a mystical trip into history. Fans of historical fiction and magical realism will enjoy this novel.

I received a free copy of this book from Zooloo’s Book Tours. My review is voluntary and my opinions are my own.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Justin Newland is an author of historical fantasy and secret history thrillers – that’s history with a supernatural twist. His stories feature known events and real people from history which are re-told and examined through the lens of the supernatural. He gives author talks and is a regular contributor to BBC Radio Bristol’s Thought for the Day. He lives with his partner in plain sight of the Mendip Hills in Somerset, England.

His Books

The Genes of Isis is a tale of love, destruction and ephemeral power set under the skies of Ancient Egypt. A re-telling of the Biblical story of the flood, it reveals the mystery of the genes of Isis – or genesis – of mankind.

The Old Dragon’s Head is a historical fantasy and supernatural thriller set during the Ming Dynasty and played out in the shadows the Great Wall of China. It explores the secret history of the influences that shaped the beginnings of modern times.

Set during the Great Enlightenment, The Coronation reveals the secret history of the Industrial Revolution.

The Abdication (July, 2021), is a suspense thriller, a journey of destiny, wisdom and self-discovery.

Justin’s Social Media

FACEBOOK

WEBSITE

BUY LINKS

Amazon UK

Amazon US

*If you buy the book, please leave reviews on Amazon and Goodreads, as well as anywhere else you review books.  Some people feel very daunted by writing a review. Don’t worry. You do not have to write a masterpiece. Just a couple of lines about how the book made you feel will make the author’s day and help the book succeed. The more reviews a book has, the more Amazon will promote it.

*Please click on the “share” buttons below and share these books with your Twitter, Facebook, and WordPress followers. A little bit of help from all of us will help self-published authors go a long way!


#Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish and is now hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together. Each week a new theme is suggested for bloggers to participate in. Create your own Top Ten list that fits that topic – putting your unique spin on it if you want. Everyone is welcome to join but please link back to The Artsy Reader Girl in your own Top Ten Tuesday post.

The topic this week is Top Ten Bookish Characters. See my responses below. EDIT: Looks like I misunderstood the task as I listed my favorite characters from books, and apparently they had to have something to do with books, but I’m going with it.

  1. Madeleine “Max” Maxwell, Historian and “Investigator of Historical Events in Contemporary Time. Do NOT call it time travel.”

Jodi Taylor is my favorite author of Time Travel Historical Fiction, and Max is the heroine of 13 books and several short stories. She also always makes an appearance in the spin-off series, The Time Police.

2. Petronius the Arbiter

My favorite book ever is also a Time Travel book–Surprise! And it’s a Heinlein book to boot. Petronius the Arbiter, or “Pete,” is the much-loved cat belonging to Dan B. Davis, the main character.

3. Neville Longbottom

Yes, he’s not very talented or popular, but Neville always finds himself in the thick of things. I love that about him.

4. Aslan

The Lion and SO MUCH MORE. The hero of the Chronicles of Narnia. I love this series.

5. Markham

Another character from The Chronicles of St. Mary’s series. Markham. Head of the Security Section (most of the time). The man with one name (or many), and keeper of secrets. Gets into uncomfortable situations a lot.

6. ACE

The beloved German Shepherd and canine best friend of Jax Diamond, a 1920s private detective. The adventures of Ace, Jax, and Broadway singer Laura will keep you entertained.

7. Jenny Dove

Another Jodi Taylor book, but nothing to do with Time Travel. This is book one of the Frogmorton Farm series. Jenny Dove is a girl with a very pronounced stutter who is largely ignored by her aunt and uncle, who have raised her since her parents died. When she sees Russell, who has just been jilted by her perfect cousin Franny, she learns to find her voice and strike out on new adventures. Along the way, she is aided by her secret weapon, a magical golden horse, Thomas.

8. Elizabeth Zott

This book just came out, but this quirky, intelligent character is already one of my favorites.

9. Elner Shimfissle

Elner Shimfissle is a character in Fannie Flagg’s Elmwood Springs series. In this book, the elderly Elner has a near-death experience after falling out of her fig tree. It’s a hoot!

10. Christy Huddleston

Catherine Marshall’s Christy is one of my all-time favorites. It’s based on her own mother’s life as a teacher in the remote Smoky Mountain town of Cutter Gap, Tennessee, in the early 1900s.

Who are your favorite characters?

Audiobook Review: The Wedding Season #WeddingFiction #Romance

When Matthew leaves Freya the day before their wedding, she is devastated but tries to hide it all behind a calm front. Not only has she been left at the altar, but she has seven weddings to go to amongst her group of friends that summer. Her fabulous friends see right through her calm demeanor and, after determining that she still wants to go to all these weddings, give her a set of tasks to complete during each event. By the end of the “wedding season,” she has learned a lot about herself and her relationships.

I feel bad being so entertained by a “left at the altar” situation, but this was uproariously funny at times. The audiobook narrator Daphne Kourna portrayed the characters’ changing emotions perfectly, whether it was humor, pain, embarrassment, betrayal, sadness, or anger.. She did a fantastic job.

The relationship between Freya and her mother is so heartwrenching, as this is not the first time she’s been abandoned. Freya’s journey through her heartbreak, both past and present, is compelling. Her supporting cast of friends are the type of people I’d like to have in my life when others let me down. It’s a rollicking recovery journey that you will not want to miss.

There are a few F-bombs for those who try to avoid that.

Overall, the rating for this entertaining book is 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5 on sites without a half-star option.

I received a free copy of this audiobook from Macmillan Audio via Netgalley. My review is voluntary and my opinions are my own.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Katy Birchall is the author of several young adult novels including The It Girl series, the Hotel Royale series and Morgan Charmley: Teen Witch. She is the co-author of the middle grade Lightning Girl series and Star Switch with Alesha Dixon, and the Find the Girl teen series with YouTube stars Lucy and Lydia Connell. Katy was proud to be the author of a retelling of Jane Austen’s Emma for the Awesomely Austen series, a collection of Austen’s novels retold for younger readers. She has also written a non-fiction book, How to be a Princess: Real-Life Fairy Tales for Modern Heroines. The Secret Bridesmaid was her adult fiction debut.

Katy lives in London with her partner, Ben, and her rescue dog, Bono.

INSTAGRAM|TWITTER

BUY LINKS

|AMAZON|AMAZON UK|B&N|

Book Review: The Salt Fields by Stacy D. Flood

This is such a powerful and amazing book. I had to use two quotes from the book itself in order to do this author’s work justice. This is an Editor’s Choice for the May edition of Historical Novels Review.

It is 1947, and Minister Peters is getting ready to board a train called The Dawn Lightning in South Carolina. Despite his name, he is not a minister. He is headed out of the South and towards a new life. Minister’s family was once enslaved and has experienced generations of loss. This continues in Minister’s life. Having lost his wife to unfaithfulness and murder, and then his daughter to drowning, Minister wants to take that train to the end of the line and leave the South behind for good. He meets three other passengers on the train. Carvall is a soldier who has just gotten out of the Army. Divinion and Lanah are a couple with questionable motives. These four lives interact in such a way that Minister will never be the same again.

Stacy D. Flood has a rare talent for writing scenes that stay with you and a unique ability to create lasting pictures in your mind. Even something many people have done, like leaving home, becomes extraordinary: “For those I’d left behind I knew my voice was only a memory, and I knew that this place, my home, would forget about the rest of me as soon as my shoes left the pebbles beneath them.” His description of nature brings it alive. “Further out in the water appeared the silhouettes of two children, a boy and a girl, holding hands, but as I passed by, gaping, I recognized them as simple tree trunks. Not ghosts, not observers or judges or the abandoned or the lost.” The scenes from this book vividly explode in your mind, and the writing evokes powerful emotion. This work is special. I highly recommend this novella to anyone who wants to read the work of a talented author.

I received a free copy of this book from the publisher, Lanternfish Press, via The Historical Novel Society. My review is voluntary and my opinions are my own.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Originally from Buffalo, and currently living in Seattle, Stacy D. Flood’s work has been published nationally and performed on stages nationwide as well as in the Puget Sound Area. He has been a DISQUIET scholar in Lisbon, an artist-in-residence at The Millay Colony of the Arts, and the recipient of a Getty Fellowship to the Squaw Valley Community of Writers

SOCIAL MEDIA:

Twitter|Instagram|Website

BUY LINKS

Amazon|Amazon UK|B&N|Audible